Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Does it matter what year or major I am?

Are the positions paid?

Do you hire work-study students?

May I earn credit for my work?

Who manages your many projects?

Who sponsors the projects?

How do I get involved?

I am concerned that I don't yet have the skills to help on a project. What can I do?

Is there a GPA requirement?

Will we work with local business and industry?

Whom should I contact if I have questions? And if I represent a company or government agency?

Does it matter what year or major I am?

No. Students, at any stage of their college careers, may come from any of the engineering or technology programs at any of the Connecticut College of Technology's partnering community colleges and universities. Many of our students become involved early in their freshman year and see their responsibilities increase as their education progresses.

Are the positions paid?

Students may be funded through grants and contracts, apply for their own Space Grant Fellowships, use work-study funds, or volunteer. Whether it is paid or not, the work is certainly something you can enthusiastically list on your resume.

Do you hire work-study students?

Absolutely. We are looking for work-study students on many projects. If your college or university has offered you the option of work-study, please contact with the Executive Director or Associate Director of the Life Support and Sustainable Living (LSSL) Program for details.

May I earn credit for my work?

Yes. Some students earn senior project or graduate credit for their participation and expended efforts on these projects. Some of the projects may qualify for independent study or as fulfillment for other courses/course requirements. Please check with your academic advisor for more information as to your institution's policies and procedures.

Who manages the Life Support and Sustainable Living Program's projects?

We work closely with the Connecticut College of Technology and their partnering institutions, who have faculty members further supporting the various projects by acting as technical advisors. We have also established relationships with several Connecticut companies who are committed to the Life Support and Sustainable Living Program in varying degrees, whether providing projects, industry representatives/mentors, materials, supplies and/or space. Industry representative, Mr. John Birch, CPBA, CPVA, CAIA, of The Birch Group, LLC, has played a major role and has managed both the Life Support & Sustainable Living Program and the Engineering Challenge for the 21st Century Program, incorporating students from high school through college.

Who sponsors the projects?

The Life Support and Sustainable Living Program is funded, in part, by the National Science Foundation and the NASA Johnson Space Center. Other sponsors include members of industry such as Hamilton Sundstrand, a division of the United Technologies Corporation, the United States Coast Guard, the Connecticut Children's Medical Center and KAMAN Aerospace.

How do I get involved?

Any of the students, faculty and/or industry representatives who have participated or been associated with the Life Support and Sustainable Living Program can provide individualized feedback and guidance/direction in the Program. Please contact the Program Director or any other Program Associate as identified within this web-site for further details or more information.

I am concerned that I don't yet have the skills to help on a project. What can I do?

Everyone has skills to offer thus the opportunity to learn exists in everything we do and with everyone we know. What you learn from those that you associate with today and what they learn from you will strengthen the future for everyone. You may want to consider joining a project team with more experienced students.

Is there a GPA requirement?

No. Students of all academic levels have valuable skills and deserve the opportunity to learn and grow through real-world experiences. A strong work ethic with the ability to fulfill commitments is key. However, you are in school to earn a degree, so your course-work must come first.

Will we work with local business and industry?

Yes. Many of the projects are sponsored by local business and industry, therefore students may have the opportunity to visit some of the Program's sponsors. For example, students frequently visit Hamilton Sundstrand to attend meetings and several students have had the opportunity to try on a real spacesuit. Other sponsors including the National Science Foundation, NASA, the United States Coast Guard, the Connecticut Children's Medical Center and KAMAN Aerospace may offer things such as site visits, materials/supplies, industry representatives/mentors and project ideas or challenges to be addressed. Sponsoring companies have engineers who will consult closely with students to advise them on their work. Some students participating in the Program have gotten involved in internships or have received career opportunities through Program sponsors.

Whom should I contact if I have questions? And if I represent a company or government agency?

Visit our contact page for contact information.